Problem Management

Problem Management KPIs - Amendment

This is a follow-up to my earlier Problem KPI post. Commentator Mark asked ‘what about Known Errors’, something my suggestions for KPIs did not cover. Thanks Mark.

Remember that the whole point of Key Performance Indicators is to tell us how effectively some process or activity (in this case Problem Management) is working. Therefore the question is what Known Errors tell us from a KPI perspective – should they be included or not as a KPI?

Problem Management KPI Suggestions

This is a follow up to my last post on the subject of KPIs in Problem Management – read that previous post for background. In what I write I’m assuming that the KPIs are going to be used in a report whose audience will be the Problem Management team (therefore, quite detailed).

I’ve concluded that we are looking for signs that the Problem Management process is working. Here are some suggestions for you to try.

1. Number of Problems raised.

Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) for Problem Management

Customer Nick asks for ideas on data he can use as a KPI for Problem Management.

That’s a really good question, and before answering it I’ll refer to the definition of what a Problem is. However, the definition of a Problem is slightly different to what the goals of Problem Management are, namely (taken from the ITIL Service Support book):

“The goal of Problem Management is to minimise the adverse impact of Incidents and Problems on the business that are caused by errors within the IT Infrastructure…”

The Thorny Issue of Identifying Problems

Emailer Steve responds to this Problem Management white paper and poses this question: what can you do if no Problems are actually raised by the Incident resolution teams? Steve specifically mentions a period of over 4 months with no Problems at all being raised. Steve’s teams are handling 2500 or so Incidents per week, has 30 or so staff on the Service Desk and a further 70 working in specialist teams like I’ve referred to in this post on escalation.

Getting started with Problem Management

If the last few posts have convinced you to give Problem Management a try – I’m glad. If not, I reserve my right to nag in future posts.

So how do you get started with your own Problem Management function, and what do you need?

Aside from a basic process, ideally you will have a CMDB (Configuration Management Data Base). I’ve posted about the CMDB here and here. I say ideally, because you can still derive benefits from Problem Management even if you don’t have one yet.

Here’s how you can get started:

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